EdTech 533 YouTube for Educators Reflection

YouTube for Educators is an elective course I chose to take to meet the requirements for the MET program at Boise State University.  This course proved to be more challenging than I ever thought it would have been. I learn a lot and plan to implement as much as possible into my classrooms!  The following is my reflection on the course that I submitted as part of my final grade for the course. At the end is a link to my YouTube channel where my artifacts from this course can be found.

As the fall 2016 semester ends, I think back to what I have learned and gained from my EdTech 533 YouTube for Educators course. Overall, I loved this class and would not mind taking another one if possible. Dr. Snelson made it easy to follow in Moodle by having due dates stated in easy to find locations and by providing guidebooks for every lesson. For me, the guidebooks are what helped me get through this course. With the inclusion of video tutorials and step-by-step instructions Dr. Snelson was highly methodically in providing everything a student will need and/or encounter in the course.

In the final essay, the class was asked to answer a few questions. Here are the questions with my answers:

  • What were the three most important things I learned this semester?

The three most important things I learned this semester were:

Copy Rights – learning about how important it is to obey copyright laws in creating videos and how to find a license to determine if I could reuse it was one of the most beneficial things I will take away from this class. I have already begun incorporating it into my current classroom.

Video Captions – an educator I need to make sure that all of my students have the same opportunity to be able to understand and learn from any and all methods I use in my class. Providing captions is just a small thing to add to all videos to help ensure I reach each and every student.

Creating a playlist in YouTube – I absolutely love how I can find videos for a certain subject or lesson and curate them into a file that will house them together. I have already used this option several times in my current classroom.  In teaching Language Arts I can find videos for all parts of speeches, on fiction and nonfiction information, elements of a plot, etc. and share the list with my students as supplemental material or use them in class!

  • Has my opinion of YouTube in education changed or remained the same? Describe three or more specific examples.

The short answer to this question is Yes! Before this class, I could “kinda” see the relevance of YouTube, but due to some content not being suitable for some students I was highly hesitant to use. My opinion has changed because I can see how I can actually incorporate it into my classroom. A couple of examples would be to create a page for each class. This would create a space for the students to be able to upload their creations throughout the year in one location. Students would then be able to use a shareable link to possibly distribute to a bigger audience. Another example would be to pick out a video and stop it before it ends and have the students create a new ending based off of what was previously shown. A final example would be to use YouTube to compare and contrast two different dragon videos or to pick out traits of the characters.

  • What have I learned about media literacy and how will that information impact me as an educator? In your response, discuss three or more core competencies of media literacy: access, analyze, evaluate, reflect, or act.

What I have learned about media literacy is allowing for options in a classroom is key. In providing access to many types of media, the students can then analyze each option to determine what would work best for them. By giving the students the responsibility of evaluating the media it provides them the opportunity to think in a critical manner to help themselves be prosperous. Developing critical thinking skills in using all types of media is essential to being college and career ready.

  • In what specific ways will I use the projects, skills, or ideas from this course in my teaching or training? (If not currently a teacher how might you use what you have learned?)

I will be utilizing what I have learned in this course in many ways. I have already incorporated the short-form educational video in my classroom. My students recently had a biography project where they had to complete research on an author of their choice and then create a presentation on them. Many of my honor students chose to use Powtoons because of the animation ability it provided. I can absolutely see how my skills I gained with the mini documentary will and should come into play. Stressing the importance of being a good digital citizen by checking copyright licenses and practicing safe use strategies alone will be most beneficial to them.

I would like to incorporate the use of a Vlog, whether by me, in the form if a daily or weekly newsletter-like item, or by my students where they have to keep a vlog about their daily or weekly assignments (I am thinking more along the lines of a video journal). This will help accomplish many underlining items such as confidence in front of a camera and speaking and enunciating clearly.

Our media literacy assignment gave me several ideas on how to get my students to think in a more synthesized manner. By thinking outside the box I could use videos to help teach such things as characterization by having them identify indirect and direct from an excerpt from a movie; elements of a plot, have them fill in a plot diagram identifying where the different elements take place in a short video, and compare and contrast internal and external conflict.

  • Select at least three of the projects you created this semester and read the description of the related AECT standard. Then answer this question: How do these projects demonstrate my mastery of the AECT standards?

The mini-documentary and short-form educational video demonstrates my mastery of the AECT Standard 3 in Ethics because we had to provide attributions on items such as video footage, pictures, or text we did not create ourselves.  It showed how plagiarism can be very easy in video creation if one does not take the time to take the proper channels in ensuring sources were cited correctly.

Vlog with captions demonstrates my mastery of the AECT Standard 3 in Diversity of Learners because it was created with a certain level of students (6th graders) in mind and that was intended to be able to reach the many different ways a student can learn. It is an excellent method to use for those learners that are more visual and hands-on ordinated.

The media literacy assignment demonstrates my mastery of the AECT Standard 4 in Assessing/Evaluating because I had evaluated videos that would fit into my topic of study. In evaluating the videos I had to keep in mind my topic and key points I wanted to convey to my students but I also needed to keep my target audience in mind. Meaning, I needed to find videos that would keep my students focused whether it was through animation and/or music and pertained the correct content.

My EdTech 533 YouTube Channel

Sylvia Plath mini-documentary

 

 

 

Peer Review

The PBL is almost complete….the end is near. But what can be done to make sure the students can be guaranteed they will be turning in an acceptable, accurate (or close to accurate) assignment? PEER REVIEW!

Peer review, if used correctly, can help build analytical skills in students. Many teachers, including myself, say they have students complete a peer review; but really they are not. In general, teachers hand over a rubric and instruct the students to critique someone else’s work and give them a grade. Well, whats wrong with that? For one, neither student gets much out of that, and two, usually the person giving the critique will not give “their friend” a bad grade. So, they barely look over a peer’s work and give them a 100. I feel that if I instruct my students to review a peer’s work AND supply some constructive criticism along with it, that it will a ensure better outcome for each student. The student that is critiquing will, hopefully, supply useful points that the peer can take back and fix. In the long run, both are staying more engaged in the assignment (I hope this makes sense).

Another technique I would use is the group evaluation. This is where each member of the group gets to assess each other. I like this method because it would allow the teacher to see how the group feels as a whole about the process they just completed. Group evaluation is also a good way to check how the teacher observations match up with each members perceptions. These evaluations need to be made anonymously as to assure accurate input from each student. A teacher could utilize a locked ballot box to ensure no other student would see another student’s evaluation.

Post Project Reflection

This weeks blog entry for my Project Based Learning class is to think about how I plan to debrief after all is said and done. Believe it or not I had trouble with this blog entry. I think it that is mainly due to the fact that I am not currently in a classroom.

  • Who will you involve in the process?

I can most definitely say the my students will be involved since they are the ones that participated. I would like to also include the administration, but I believe that will be determined by the administration I will have at the time I implement this PBL. Eventually I would like to include an ad agency or some professionals in the advertising field to help make this a more authentic PBL.

  • What will your process look like?

Most of my debrief will be from my own reflections during this PBL. These reflections will include info from my observations during the PBL, the final articles that were submitted, and the feedback surveys completed by the students. I would like to conduct an open discussion with the students to get their verbal feedback because sometimes students will say more than they are willing to write down on paper. I would also love to have an administrator hear this conversation.

  • Is it just a one-time assessment?

No lesson has a one-time assessment. I believed all teachers constantly assess their lessons multiple times to change or at least reflect on the actual outcomes versus what was perceived at the beginning of the PBL.

Here is a link to my PBL Advertising for a Cause.

The Importance of Scaffolding in a PBL

Scaffolding is very important when creating Project Based Learning (PBL). It helps to keep students focused and motivated. A teacher cannot present a PBL and then walk away and have the students work completely on their own. They have to constantly facilitate. Scaffolding allows for small instruction and facilitation. As a  facilitator, teachers may show (demonstrate) how to complete a task that will be done on that day.

In my PBL, I plan for small instruction and demonstrations daily. At the beginning there will be  more small instruction about what is needed to be in their projects. As we go along I will move to facilitator. I will need to demonstrate file conversion and how to begin editing a video/voice recording, just to name a few.

A teacher’s role is very minimal in a PBL. That is why scaffolding is so important and needs to be done correctly. Students tend to get bored or distracted easily, but with scaffolding this can be minimized as best as possible.